Cojoweb.com's   Unclaimed Funds / Property Page 

Every day, someone loses some form of financial property because of a change of address, death, or just plain forgetfulness.

NOTE:    There are some particulars for the way each state addresses the subject of unclaimed property. Be sure to read the guidelines for the state you are searching. See the State URLs listed below.

 Two Examples of Frequently Asked Questions 

North Carolina - Frequently Asked Questions

New York - Frequently Asked Questions

 

States Websites for Unclaimed Funds - Click URL Listed Below

- also -

Archives and Records Info. by State - Click State Abbreviation Listed Below

Archival and Genealogical Info. by State - The USGenWeb Project - Click State Listed Below

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Alabama  AL Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasury.state.al.us/website/ucpd/ucpd_frameset.html 
Alaska  AK Unclaimed Funds  http://www.tax.state.ak.us/tas/ucpsrch.htm 
Arkansas  AR Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.ar.us/auditor/unclprop/
Arizona   AZ Unclaimed Funds  http://www.revenue.state.az.us/unclm/unclprop.htm 
California  CA Unclaimed Funds  https://scoweb.sco.ca.gov/scoucp/inquiry/ 
Colorado  CO Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasurer.state.co.us/second/index.html 
Connecticut  CT Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.ct.us/ott/ucplisting.htm 
Delaware DE Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.de.us/revenue/escheat/escheat.htm 
Florida   FL Unclaimed Funds  http://up.dbf.state.fl.us/Isearch.cfm 
Georgia GA Unclaimed Funds  http://www2.state.ga.us/departments/dor/ptd/adm/taxguide/ucp.html
Hawaii  HI Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.hi.us/budget/uncprop/uncprop.htm 
Idaho  ID Unclaimed Funds  http://www2.state.id.us/tax/unclaimed_idaho.htm 
Illinois IL Unclaimed Funds  http://www.cashdash.net/ 
Indiana  IN Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.in.us/serv/ag_ucp 
Iowa IA Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasurer.state.ia.us/unclaimed/great.cfm 
Kansas   KS Unclaimed Funds  http://kansasstatetreasurer.com/index.ihtml 
Kentucky KY Unclaimed Funds  http://www.kytreasury.com/  
Louisiana LA Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasury.state.la.us/ucp/claim/simplesearch.asp 
Massachusetts  MA Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.ma.us/treasury/Abp.htm 
Maine ME Unclaimed Funds  http://thor.ddp.state.me.us/treasurer/plsql/tredev.unclaimed_property.search_form 
Maryland MD Unclaimed Funds  http://www.marylandtaxes.com/ 
Minnesota MN Unclaimed Funds  http://www.commerce.state.mn.us/pages/UnclaimedMain.htm
Mississippi MS Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasury.state.ms.us/upsearch.htm 
Missouri MO Unclaimed Funds  http://www.sto.state.mo.us/ucp/ucp.htm
Montana MT Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.mt.us/revenue/css/2forindividuals/08unclaimedproperty.asp 
Michigan MI Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treas.state.mi.us/unclprop/searchunclaimedproperty.htm
Nebraska NE Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasurer.state.ne.us/ie/uphome.asp
New Hampshire NH Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.nh.us/treasury/appage.html#request
New Jersey NJ Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.nj.us/treasury/taxation/index.html?updiscl.htm~mainFrame
New York NY Q&A Unclaimed Funds  http://www.osc.state.ny.us/cgi-bin/db2www/ouffrm.d2w/input
New Mexico NM Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.nm.us/tax/trd_esrv99.htm
Nevada NV Unclaimed Funds  http://nevadatreasurer.com/unclaimed/

North Carolina 

NC Q&A Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasurer.state.nc.us/  
North Dakota ND Unclaimed Funds  http://www.land.state.nd.us/ 
Ohio OH Unclaimed Funds  http://www4.state.oh.us/com/unfd/qry1.stm
Oklahoma OK Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.ok.us/~sto/
Oregon OR Unclaimed Funds  http://statelands.dsl.state.or.us/upframe.htm 
Pennsylvania  PA Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasury.state.pa.us/UnclaimedPropertyInquiry.html 
Rhode Island RI Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.ri.us/treas/moneylst.htm 
South Carolina SC Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.sc.us/treas/unclaimedproperty/index.html 
South Dakota SD Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.sd.us/treasurer/search/index.cfm 
Tennessee  TN Unclaimed Funds  http://www.treasury.state.tn.us/unclaim/ 
Texas TX Unclaimed Funds  https://www.window.state.tx.us/unclprop/search.html 
Utah  UT Unclaimed Funds  http://www.up.state.ut.us/ 
Vermont VT Unclaimed Funds  http://www.tre.state.vt.us/AbanProp/ap_lookup.html 
Virginia VA Unclaimed Funds  http://www.trs.state.va.us/frames/ucp_index.htm 
Washington WA Unclaimed Funds  http://dor.wa.gov/ 
West Virginia WV Unclaimed Funds  http://www.wvtreasury.com/search_unclaimed_property_databa.htm 
Wisconsin  WI Unclaimed Funds  http://prd1.state.wi.us/servlet/trdUnclaimProperty 
Wyoming WY Unclaimed Funds  http://www.state.wy.us/~sot/find.

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New York - Frequently Asked Questions

  1. "What Kind of Funds Become Unclaimed?"
  2. "How & When Do Accounts Become Unclaimed?"
  3. "Is There A Time Limit or Fee For Claiming Unclaimed Funds Held By The State?"
  4. "How Can I Claim Funds Held By The State?"
  5. "How Can I Find Out The Dollar Amount Of The Funds?"
  6. "Will I Receive Interest On The Funds?"
  7. "How Long Will It Take To Receive My Funds?"
  8. "How Do I Know If I Am Entitled To Funds Listed In My Name?"
  9. "What If I Can't Prove The Address Of Record?"
  10. "What If I Can't Prove Ownership Of The Funds?"
  11. "What If The Owner Is Deceased?"
  12. "Where Can I Find Unclaimed Funds In Other States?"

 

"What Kind of Funds Become Unclaimed?"

  • Savings Accounts
  • Checking Accounts
  • Uncashed Checks
  • Telephone/Utility Deposits
  • Rental Security Deposits
  • Wages
  • Insurance Benefits/Policies
  • Safe Deposit Box Contents
  • Mortgage Insurance Refunds
  • Stocks and Dividends
  • Mutual Funds
  • Certificates of Deposit
  • Trust Funds
  • Estate Proceeds

 

UPLogo.gif (7426 bytes)

"How Do Accounts Become Unclaimed?"

Did you ever...

In cases like these, your money is eventually turned over to the State. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"When Do These Accounts Become Unclaimed?"

State law requires banks, insurance companies, utilities, and other businesses to turn dormant savings accounts, unclaimed insurance and stock dividends, and other inactive holdings over to the State. If there has been no activity in the account for a set period of time, usually between two and five years, your money is considered unclaimed or abandoned.

Before unclaimed funds are turned over to the State, banks and insurance companies attempt to notify you by mail and are required to publish newspaper listings of names and addresses. Despite these efforts, many funds remain unclaimed and are turned over to the State Comptroller, who acts as custodian. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"Is There A Time Limit or Fee For Claiming Unclaimed Funds Held By The State?"

No, there is no time limit and no fee for this service.

New York State holds unclaimed funds in trust - with the State Comptroller as custodian - until the funds are claimed by the owner or heir. The State never takes ownership of the money. It is held for you until you claim it. If at any time you can prove this money is yours, the Comptroller will return it to you without charge.

Please Note: If you are contacted by someone other than the State Comptroller's Office, the maximum fee they can charge you for helping you claim your money is 15%. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"How Can I Claim Funds Held By The State?"

If you found your name on the list, click on the Account # (in blue text) for the item you are claiming. Also, please see How To File A Claim... 

You can also write to our Office, be sure to include your name, current and all previous addresses, and your social security number. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"How Can I Find Out The Dollar Amount Of the Funds?"

By law, we can not disclose dollar amounts for unclaimed funds until we receive proof of entitlement. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"Will I Receive Interest On The Funds?"

In New York, by law, we only pay interest on interest bearing items, such as savings accounts, for a period of five years from the date we receive the property. The interest rate is set by the New York State Department of Tax & Finance, and is updated quarterly. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"How Long Will It Take To Receive My Funds?"

You will receive an acknowledgement letter within a month after we receive your claim. Due to a tremendous increase in claims activity and the significant work done to ensure that all funds are returned to the rightful owners, please allow six months or more for your claim to be reviewed and verified. If additional documentation is required, you will be notified in writing after our review is completed. Please note that all claims involving estates take considerably longer. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"How Do I Know If I Am Entitled To Funds Listed In My Name?"

The easiest way to determine if the person listed is you is to check the address associated with the funds. Check to see if you lived or did business at the address. We can not list the Social Security number because it is considered private under the law, and in many instances we don't know it. However, you must include your Social Security Number on the claim form to verify ownership. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"What If I Can't Prove The Address Of Record?"

For examples of acceptable proof, please see How To File A Claim.

Please note, in almost all cases we require proof of the address on record.  However, if you simply can not provide proof that you once used the old address, just mail in the completed claim form.  Attach a note indicating that you don't have proof of the old address.  We will advise you in writing of exactly what will be required to claim the account. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"What If I Can't Prove Ownership?"

For examples of acceptable ownership, please see How To File A Claim.

Please note, not all items require proof of ownership. If you have the original document, (ex. check, passbook, bond) we recommend sending a copy of it. If not, just complete the claim form and attach proof of the old address. If further documentation is required, you will be advised in writing. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"What If The Owner Is Deceased?"

The funds can be claimed by the court appointed representative of the estate. If a representative was not appointed, the funds can still be claimed by a relative (next of kin) or a creditor. However, we will need confirmation of who is entitled to claim the funds, a photocopy of the death certificate, and proof that the deceased once used the address of record. [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

"Where Can I Find Unclaimed Funds In Other States?" 

See Websites listed by State above 

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You can get a list of all state unclaimed property programs from the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators. You can visit their website at NAUPA.

 

MissingMoney.com

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Maine New Hampshire Vermont Massachusetts Massachusetts Rhode Island Rhode Island Connecticut New York Connecticut New Jersey Delaware Maryland Washington, D.C. Pennsylvania New Jersey Delaware Maryland West Virginia Ohio Alaska Alaska Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Virgin Islands Virgin Islands Virgin Islands Puerto Rico Virginia North Carolina South Carolina Georgia Florida Alabama Tennessee Kentucky Indiana Illinois Michigan Michigan Wisconsin Mississippi Louisiana Arkansas Missouri Iowa Minnesota North Dakota South Dakota Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma Texas Colorado Wyoming Montana New Mexico Utah Idaho Arizona Nevada Guam Hawaii Washington Alaska California Oregon

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How To File A Claim

1. In New York (for example) click on the Account Number you wish to claim (in blue).

2. Complete the Claimant Information fields on the Claim Form. Include your full name and current address.

3. Print the Claim Form. Sign the form, and have your signature notarized by a licensed notary public.

4. Attach proof of the address shown under Account Information on the Claim Form.

5. Mail completed claim form to our office. You will be notified if we require further proof of ownership.

Don't forget to...

  • Sign the form 
  • Have your signature notarized 
  • Include your Social Security Number 
  • Attach proof of the address shown in Account Information 
To ensure that all funds are paid to the rightful owners, we ask that all claim forms be submitted with proof that you once used the address listed in the account information. 

We may also require proof of ownership. 

If the owner is deceased, you must provide a copy of the death certificate in addition to proof of address. 

Proof of Address

    Photocopies of the following are considered acceptable proof of address: Driver's license; non-driver photo ID Birth and Marriage certificates; passport (if address is shown) Bills and Statements; such as banking, utility, medical, credit cards Records; such as tax (W2, 1099), school, insurance, medical, military Legal papers; such as divorce decree; separation agreement; mortgage, Post marked envelope.  [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]
Proof of Ownership
    Original copies of the following are considered acceptable proofs of ownership: Bank books; Pass books Statements; bank, mutual fund, utility bills Certificates; stocks, bonds, bond coupons Uncashed checks; money orders; gift certificates, traveler's checks Insurance Policies.  [top]   [New York State - Frequently Asked Questions]

 

North Carolina - Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is an Escheat?
2. What is unclaimed property?
3. How long is a dormancy periods?
4. Who is a holder?
5. When does property become “Unclaimed”?
6. When are Holders required to report Unclaimed Property?
7. Is there a minimum amount that does not have to be reported?
8. Are holders obligated to report and remit unclaimed property to other states?
9. Is there a specific way to report unclaimed property?
10. Is a holder required to do anything to locate the owner prior to remitting the funds?
11. What happens if a holder does NOT report unclaimed property?
12. Can a holder reimburse a customer or reactivate a customer’s account?
13. What attempts are made by the State to find the rightful owner?
14. What does the State do with the money before it is claimed?
15. What is the purpose of this law and the Escheat Program?

 

1. What is an Escheat?


Simply put, an escheat is the succession of abandoned property to the State. It is commonly associated with properties that comes from an estate of a person dying without a will and without any know heirs. However, this concept has been broadened to include the recovery of any property that results from the failure of a person legally entitled to that property to make a valid claim against the holder of the property within a prescribe period of time. Consequently, the terms escheat and unclaimed property are used interchangeably.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

2. What is unclaimed property?


Unclaimed property consists of bank accounts, wages, refunds, utility deposits, insurance policy proceeds, stocks, bonds, contents of safe deposit boxes, etc. that have been abandoned – that is, for which there have been no documented transactions or contact with the owners for a statutory period of time known as a dormancy period. There are over 100 types of property which may become unclaimed. The term property is defined in North Carolina General Statute 116B-52(11). There is a detailed listing on the back of the ASD-159 reporting form.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

3. How long is a dormancy periods?


In most cases, the dormancy period varies from 1 to 5 years depending on the property type. Utility deposits and refunds have a 1-year dormancy period. Wages have a 2-year dormancy period. Accounts payable items have a 5- year dormancy period. The dormancy holding periods is discussed in North Carolina General Statute 116B-53(c). Also they are listed on the back of the ASD-159 reporting form.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

4. Who is a holder?


North Carolina General Statute 116B-52 (5) states “Holder means a person obligated to hold for the account of or deliver or pay to owner property that is subject to this Chapter.” In essence, any business association in possession of property is a potential holder. This includes but is not limited to banks, insurance companies, utilities, corporations, government agencies, nonprofit organizations…
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

5. When does property become “Unclaimed”?


In accordance with North Carolina General Statute 116B-53, property becomes unclaimed when the owner has not communicated in writing or by other means reflected an interest in the property or the account in which the property is held. An indication of interest may include the cashing of a check, owner directed increase or decrease of the property, owner activity in another account, the payment of a premium or amount owed.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

6. When are Holders required to report Unclaimed Property?


As stated in North Carolina General Statute 116B-60(d), the report must be filed before November 1 of each year and cover the 12 months next preceding July 1 of that year for all Holders except Life Insurance. Life Insurance companies must file before May 1 of each year for the calendar year next proceeding.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

7. Is there a minimum amount that does not have to be reported?


No. North Carolina General Statute 116B does not exclude small dollar amounts. Businesses must report all unclaimed property, regardless of the amount. Items under $50 may be reported and remitted in a lump amount as Aggregate. Names and address do not have to be provided for aggregate amounts.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

8. Are holders obligated to report and remit unclaimed property to other states?


Yes. The Supreme Court ruling in Texas vs. New Jersey dictates that unclaimed property must be reported and remitted to the state of the owner’s last known address. If that state does not have an applicable law regarding the property, the property must be sent to the holder’s state of incorporation. If the owner’s last known address is unknown, that property would also be reported to the holder’s state of incorporation.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

9. Is there a specific way to report unclaimed property?


Yes. An ASD-21 (Report of Unclaimed Property) and an ASD-159 (Report of Unclaimed Property Verification and Checklist) must be used to report abandoned property. Please note that the ASD-159 must be notarized. In addition, Holders with listings of over fifty (50) owners are requested to submit their report via diskette in the specified NAUPA standard electronic file format. The NAUPA format and electronic reports may be obtained at www.wagers.net/hrs/index.htm. A hard copy of your report must be included with your electronic filing for internal control purposes. Tangible property must be submitted on form ASD-127 and securities on an ASD-215. These forms may be downloaded from our website. A check for the total amount escheated must accompany the proper forms.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

10. Is a holder required to do anything to locate the owner prior to remitting the funds?


YES! A holder must perform due diligence. North Carolina General Statute 116B-59 requires that: (1) a holder make a good faith effort to locate the owner and (2) a holder shall send a written notice (NCGS 116B-59(c) defines what should be included in the notice. A sample notice is also available under the Guides to Unclaimed Property on our website.), by first-class mail, to the apparent owner, not more than 120 days or less than 60 days before filing the report to the last known address of the apparent owner as reflected in the holder’s records, if the value of the property is $50.00 or more. Holders not performing this requirement may be subject to penalties provision of NCGS 116B-77.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

11. What happens if a holder does NOT report unclaimed property?


A holder who fails to report, pay or deliver property within the time prescribed by law, or fails to perform duties required by this law, such as due diligence, will be subject to all penalties under G.S. 116B-77. This could include a daily interest penalty, a $1,000 civil penalty each day the report is withheld, plus 25% of the value of any property that should have been reported. Also a holder who fails to report may be a likely audit candidate.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

12. Can a holder reimburse a customer or reactivate a customer’s account?


Yes. A holder may reimburse a customer or reactivate an account even though the money has already been sent to the State Treasurer. If a holder chooses to reinstate an account, the holder may file a substantiated claim with the Unclaimed Property Division and be reimbursed for the funds.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

13. What attempts are made by the State to find the rightful owner?


As required by statute, a listing of owners of unclaimed property is sent annually to the clerk of superior court of each county and to at least two newspapers having general circulation in North Carolina. In addition, other attempts are made by the State Treasurer that are not required by statute. Such means include an internet search on our website, our presence as local events, fairs, and festivals, additional media coverage such as television and radio, state legislators, Equifax searches, etc.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

14. What does the State do with the money before it is claimed?


The North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority (SEAA) is an agency of the State of North Carolina and is authorized by the General Assembly to administer post-secondary education programs of student financial assistance created under Federal or State law. North Carolina General Statute 116B-37 provides that the interest earnings from the Escheat Fund, minus administrative expenses, be deposited with the SEAA. The law further provides that this money will be utilized to provide low interest loans to worthy and needy North Carolina students in State-supported schools of higher education. This year $18,644,820 was deposited with the SEAA for this purpose. This will provide over 5,500 additional low-interest loans to North Carolina students in State-supported schools of higher education.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

15. What is the purpose of this law and the Escheat Program?


In 1970, legislation mandated that the North Carolina Department of State Treasurer assume responsibility for the administration of the escheat program that was previously administered by the University of North Carolina. The purpose of the program is to: Recover unclaimed or forgotten property Reunite these properties with the rightful owner Remit the interest earnings on the funds invested to the North Carolina State Educational Assistance Authority to provide loans to worthy and needy North Carolina students in State-supported institutions of higher education.
 [top]   [North Carolina Frequently Asked Questions]

 

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